Dreading the Upcoming Elections

Image courtesy of memegenerator.net.

I haven’t been talking much about the upcoming elections here in the States because I don’t want to be part of the morbid circus of trash news cycles. News agencies have become glorified pot stirrers. Facebook wants to sell influence with users, but doesn’t want the responsibility of that influence. Truth continues to be meaningless – something which happened long before 2016 if I’m being honest.

I could go on a long diatribe/rant/soliloquy about things that are messed up in my country and the world. Watching news makes me feel like it at times. According to the latest headlines, ISIS could be on the rise. Iran wants to get nukes so it can do some alarming thing. Donald Trump needs to get impeached, right the fuck now, for things that happened a few months to four years ago. Everything’s a crisis, an alarm, a call to action.

Something I’ve noticed is that a lot of this stuff doesn’t help anyone domestically or abroad. There are some urgent issues which need to be addressed (like climate change – your insurance rates believe it’s real even if you don’t). Beyond that, we as a species might want to work on behaving less like our primate cousins.

The election isn’t going to solve these real and imagined crises. The election is going to get conducted in the most obnoxious way possible. These two things ramp up my anxiety.* I’m not looking forward to dealing with any of it.

Four years ago, I let my fears get the better of me. I’m writing about my upcoming dread because I want to get ahead of it this time. If all goes well, I’ll weather the storm and see everyone on the other side.

*As one example of how my anxiety messes with me, I sometimes worry that I’m going to catch shit at my polling place when I ask for a Democratic ballot. Although it shouldn’t be a problem for me, sometimes people do and say things around me to make me feel like it could be a thing.

3 thoughts on “Dreading the Upcoming Elections

    • In the U.S., elections are based on individual candidates and not party representation. They are also managed at the state level.
      This changes how they work in little ways from state to state.

      Multiple candidates from the same party can run in an election. When that happens, the party is required to have a primary election where interested voters can select a candidate to run in the general election. Most states restrict voting to one party’s primary. This can happen in different ways. Some states require a voter to register with a single party, and that voter will only receive access to that party’s primary ballots.

      In Alabama, voters don’t have to register. Instead, they ask for a party’s ballot at the polls. For people living in a district with overwhelming support for one party, this can make things awkward for people who don’t support that party.

      Like

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